Glastonbury Tor

Glastonbury Tor stands in the middle of Sommerset Plains. The plains are reclaimed land. This means that the Glastonbury Tor was once a peninsula jutting into a lake. For this reason the Tor is believed to be the final resting place of King Arthur, the legendary island of Avalon. Indeed the area was known in Celtic as Ynys yr Afalon or the island of Avalon. The Glastonbury Tor has seven almost symmetrical terraces which has added to the confusion and interest of the site.

On the top of Glastonbury Tor is the remains of St Micheal’s Church. The tower is all that remains after earthquakes and the dissolution of Monasteries. In 1184 the church caught fire and was severely damaged. Nine years later A monk claimed to have found two graves that were believed to be the graves of King Arthur and Guinevere. It was claimed that the graves were labelled as such. The bodies were exhumed and reburied at Glastonbury Abbey before King Edward I and his queen. These events led to Glastonbury Tor being immortalised in Arthurian fables. This has only lead to people believing the Glastonbury Tor to be the legendary island of Avalon.

Glastonbury Tor

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